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Riddle:

A man has Ten Horses and nine stables as shown here. [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] The man wants to fit Ten Horses into nine stables. How can he fit Ten horses into nine stables?

Answer:

One letter for each stable. [T][E][N] [H][O][R][S][E][S]

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Riddle:

I have three envelopes, into one of them I put a £20 note. I lay the envelopes out on a table in front of me and allow you to pick one envelope. You hold but do not open this envelope. I then take one of the envelopes from the table, demonstrate to you that it was empty, screw it up and throw it away. The question is would you rather stick with the envelope you have selected or exchange it for the one on the table. Why? What would be the expected value to you of the exchange?

Answer:

The answer might seem a little counter intuitive at first but we'll see...
The short answer is that it is in your advantage to exchange. But why?
Well initially there was a 1/3 chance that you were holding the envelope with the note in it and a 2/3 chance that the note was on the table.
This is still the case after one of the envelopes on the table has been removed, there is still a 1/3 chance that you have the note and a 2/3 chance of it being on the table.
If this is confusing then it may help to think that the questioner knows which envelope the £20 note is in, though in practice it doesn't actually matter. The questioner would always be able to demonstrate that the note was not in one of the envelopes on the table regardless of where the note was, so the fact that he was able to do this changes nothing.
Consider a different example....
Say there are a 1000 envelopes on the table, 1 with a note inside. You pick 1 envelope, the chance that this has the note in it is clearly 1/1000, where as the chance that it is still on the table is 999/1000. Odds are its on the table. Now the questioner could, assuming he can remember where the note is demonstrate to you that the note is not in 998 of the envelopes on the table. In this case nothing would have happened to change the fact that there is only a 1/1000 chance of you having the note.
That is why you exchange.
What is the value of the exchange?
Simply before the exchange you have 1/3 of £20 and afterwards you will have 2/3 of £20, ie the advantage to you is about £6.66

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Riddle:

Two hours ago it was as long after one o'clock in the afternoon as it was before one o'clock in the morning. What time is it now?

Answer:

It would be 9:00 pm. There are 12 hours between 1:00 pm and 1:00 am and half of that is six hours. Half-way between would be 7 o'clock. Two hours later it would be 9:00 o'clock.

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Riddle:

A group of soldiers were standing in the blistering sun facing due west. Their sergeant shouted at them: Right turn! About turn! Left turn! In which direction are they now facing?

Answer:

East. A right turn is 90 degrees, an about turn is 180 degrees, and a left turn is also 90 degrees. Therefore, the soldiers are now facing east.

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Riddle:

An old parchment describes the location of buried treasure: "On the island there are only two trees, A and B, and the remains of a gallows. Start at the gallows and count the steps required to walk in a straight line to tree A. At the tree turn 90 degrees to the left and then walk forward the same number of steps. At the point where you top drive a spike into the ground. Now return to the gallows and walk in a straight line, counting your steps, to tree B. When you reach the tree, turn 90 degrees to the right and take the same number of steps forward, placing another spike at the point where you stop. Dig at the point exactly halfway between the spikes and you will find the treasure." However, our hero when he gets to the island finds the gallows missing. Is there any way he can still get to the treasure?

Answer:

A simple experiment with a ruler and paper shows that any position for the gallows leads to the same point.

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Riddle:

A man buys a rope from a woman for $3.00 and hands the woman a $10 bill. The woman goes into the grocery store next door to get change. She returns and gives the man $7.00. After the man leaves, the clerk from the store comes and says, "Hey, that was a counterfeit bill you gave me." The woman gives the clerk a good bill.

How much has the woman lost?

Answer:

Seven dollars plus the rope.

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Riddle:

Three cars had driven into a parking lot at the same time, and the three drivers left them all for the attendant to park. Unfortunately, he isn't too good at remembering exactly which driver drove which car. However, he is sure of these 6 facts: a. Colin drove the BMW if and only if Mr. Cooper drove the Avenger. b. Alan drove the Cortina if and only if Mr. Cooper drove the BMW. c. Colin is Mr. Brown if and only if Mr. Andrews drove the BMW. d. Brian is Mr. Andrews if and only if Colin drove the BMW. e. Mr. Cooper drove the Avenger if and only if Alan is Mr. Brown. f. Colin is Mr. Brown if and only if Alan drove the Cortina. Who arrived with which car?

Answer:

Brian Brown drove the BMW, Alan Andrew drove the Avenger, and Colin Cooper drove the Cortina.

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Riddle:

They are scenes of madness, grief, gaiety, seeming purpose, confusion and queerness often appearing in the dark hours of night. They stretch through time, seeming only but a few moments, yet when reality is not as kind. When appearing they are logical, but when reminiscing they are strange and odd. What is it?

Answer:

Dreams.

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Riddle:

There are 50 horses and 50 kings riding along an old dirt road. They came to a peach tree with 50 peaches. Each took one, yet there were still 49 left. How is this possible?

Answer:

Each is the name of one of the kings and he's the only one that took one!

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Riddle:

Morgan was making apricot jam. She put all the apricots in the pot and stirred them up. Then she remembered she had to add 1 ounce of lemon juice for every two apricots! How did she figure out how much lemon juice to put?

Answer:

She counted the pits!

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These logic riddles will help build your lateral thinking. Twist your brain and see if you can figure them out. Find one to challenge your most logical friends. We will be adding some of the classic grid pattern logic puzzles soon. See what we got and see what you can figure out. Good Luck!

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