ADVERTISEMENT
Riddle:

You are standing in front of a room with one lightbulb inside of it. You cannot see if it is on or off. Outside the room there are 3 switches in the off positions. You may turn the switches any way you want to. You stop turning the switches, enter the room and know which switch controls the lightbulb. How?

Answer:

You turn 2 switches "on" and leave 1 switch "off" and wait about a minute. Then enter the room, but just before you enter, turn one switch from "on" to "off". Once in the room, feel the lightbulb - if it is warm, but off, it has to be the last switch you turned off. If it is on, it has to be the switch left on. If it is cold and is off, it has to be the switch you left in the off position.

Is this worth sharing?
Comment
Riddle:

Two cars were involved in an accident in the center of town. The man who was driving a little green car, had overtaken a big black car. The driver had misjudged the distance between him and the on-coming traffic and had to swerve back in, causing the black car to swerve and crash into a shop window. When the occupants of the cars were examined everyone in the green car was okay, but in the black car was one dead man. However, the driver of the green car was not charged with manslaughter, why was this so?

Answer:

The black car was a hearse and was on its way to a funeral.

Is this worth sharing?
Comment
Riddle:

Two travellers spend from 12 o'clock to 6 o'clock walking along a level road, up a hill and back again. Their pace is 4 mph on the level, 3 mph uphill, and 6 mph downhill.

How far do they walk and at what time do they reach the top of the hill?

Answer:

24 miles half past three.

Is this worth sharing?
Comment
Riddle:

Robert and David were preparing to have a water balloon fight. "No Fair" cried Robert, "You have 3 times as many as I do!" David said "Fine!" and gave Robert 10 more balloons. "Still not fair!" argued Robert, "You still have twice as many as I do." How many more balloons must David give Robert for them to have the same number?

Answer:

David must give Robert another 20 water balloons, giving them each 60. Robert started with 30 water balloons and David with 90.

Is this worth sharing?
Comment
Riddle:

Jack has 8 bricks 7 of them weights the same amount and one is slightly heavier. Using a balance scale, how can Jack find the heavier brick in two weighings?

Answer:

First he split them in to piles of 3, 3, and 2 bricks. Then he weighs both groups of 3 with each other. If they balance he knows the brick is one of the 2 unweighed bricks and he can weigh them to find the heaver one. If the the stacks of 3 bricks do not balance, he will weigh 2 of the 3 bricks. If they balance he will know the brick left unweighed is heavier, or if they do not balance, he will find the heavier one.

Is this worth sharing?
Comment
ADVERTISEMENT
Riddle:

You are in a room that is completely bricked in on all four sides, including the ceiling and floor. You have nothing but a mirror and a wooden table in the room with you. How do you get out?

Answer:

You look in the mirror you see what you saw, you take the saw and you cut the table in half, two halves make a whole, and you climb out the hole.

Is this worth sharing?
Comment
Riddle:

Three working women have different careers. If only one of statements 1, 2 and 3 are true, can you tell whether or not Mary is a nurse? 1. This statement is only true if statement 5 is false. 2. This statement is true if statements 4 or 5, or both 4 and 5 are true. 3. This statement is false only if both statements 6 and 1 are true. 4. Mary is a nurse 5. Karen is an artist. 6. Sarah is a photographer.

Answer:

Mary is not a nurse. The way to solve this riddle, is to consider statements 4, 5, and 6 and create a chart of all possible true and false answers. Next, fill in the chart according to statements 1 through 3. You will discover that there is only one line where only one of statements one, two and three are true. Thus, it is determined that: Statement 4 and 5 are false and statement 6 is true.

Is this worth sharing?
Comment
Riddle:

I run, it runs, I stop, it runs

What it it? 

Answer:

My watch.

Is this worth sharing?
Comment
Riddle:

My first is high, My second damp, My whole a tie, A writer's cramp.

Answer:

Hyphen. The first two lines yield high-fen. A hyphen is used by a writer to tie (or cramp) two words together

Is this worth sharing?
Comment
Riddle:

Five baby boomer couples each have one child. Each child is a different age than any of the other children. Each child has a favorite toy which is different from any of the other children's favorite toys. Each family eats at only one fast food restaurant. No two women have the same name and no two men have the same name. The children's names are not known. The child who plays with trains is the youngest. Bill's child plays with a GI Joe. Julie's child likes Pokeman. Mike's family eats at Taco Bell. The family of the 4 year old likes Kentucky Fried Chicken. The oldest child is four years older than Marie's child. The child who plays with Barbie is 8 years old. The child with the age is in the middle, has a mother named Marie. The child in the family that eats at McDonalds has a two year age difference with Larry's child. Carol is the mother in the family that eats at Dairy Queen. The child that plays Nintendo likes Burger King. Steve's child is two years apart in age from the child of the family that eats at Kentucky Fried Chicken. The child that plays with trains is two years apart from the 6 year old. The child that eats at McDonalds is two years older or younger than Regina's child. Lisa's child is 10. Who is married to George?

Answer:

Lisa is married to George, and their 10 year old plays with Nintendo. They like to eat at Burger King. The associations are: Child age 4, mother Regina, Father Larry, trains, KFC Child age 6, mother Julie, Father Steve, Pokeman, McDonalds Child age 8, mother Marie, Father Mike, Barbie, Taco Bell Child age 10, mother Lisa, Father George, Nintendo, Burger King Child age 12, mother Carol, Father Bill, GI Joe, Dairy Queen To solve, draw a grid with five rows and five columns. Across the top, above the columns, write Age, Mother, Father, Toy and Food. Figure out the known ages and write them in order in the first column. One child's age is unknown at first. However, once the youngest child is discovered (the one who plays with trains) it is then known that the oldest child is the child with the unknown age. Through additional clues, it is possible to determine that the oldest child is age 12. Take the clue, Lisa?s child is 10. In the mother column corresponding to the age 10, you would write LISA (Maybe circle it, because it is the correct answer.) In the mother column for every other age, write "not Lisa". Do this for each clue. If you know the answer because of a clue, write it in the appropriate column, and then be sure to write "not such and such" in all the other rows for that clue. For example, "The youngest child plays with trains", would result in "not trains" for any child you can tell isn?t the youngest, but you can?t write "trains" for any child, because you don?t know which child is the youngest at first. Eventually, you may find that "mother not Marie" is on every line except one, and then you would know that Marie is the mother on the empty line.

Is this worth sharing?
Comment
ADVERTISEMENT