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Riddle:

I move very slowly at an imperceptible rate, although I take my time, I am never late. I accompany life, and survive past demise, I am viewed with esteem in many women's eyes.

What am I?

Answer:

I am your hair.

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Riddle:

While playing with a metal washer shaped like a ring, Dave accidently pushed it on his finger too far and couldn't get it off. Trying to remove it using soap and water didn't work. The hospital sent him to a service station thinking they could cut the metal. Since the ring was made with a specially hardened steel, it couldn't be cut. Just then Bob arrived on the scene and suggested an easy way to remove the washer in just a few minutes. What was his solution?

Answer:

Bob suggested that Dave hold his finger in the air while someone wound a piece of string tightly around his finger just above the metal ring. The string forced the swelling down. As they unwounded the string from the end nearest the ring, someone else slid the ring up. They continued winding and unwinding the string until the ring could be easily removed.

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Riddle:

An eye in a blue face Saw an eye in a green face. "That eye is like to this eye" Said the first eye, "But in low place Not in high place."

Answer:

The sun on the daisies.

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Riddle:

You are given a set of scales and 12 marbles. The scales are of the old balance variety. That is, a small dish hangs from each end of a rod that is balanced in the middle. The device enables you to conclude either that the contents of the dishes weight the same or that the dish that falls lower has heavier contents than the other. The 12 marbles appear to be identical. In fact, 11 of them are identical, and one is of a different weight. Your task is to identify the unusual marble and discard it. You are allowed to use the scales three times if you wish, but no more. Note that the unusual marble may be heavier or lighter than the others. You are asked to both identify it and determine whether it is heavy or light

Answer:

Most people seem to think that the thing to do is weight six coins against six coins, but if you think about it, this would yield you no information concerning the whereabouts of the only different coin. As we already know that one side will be heavier than the other. So that the following plan can be followed, let us number the coins from 1 to 12. For the first weighing let us put on the left pan coins 1,2,3,4 and on the right pan coins 5,6,7,8. There are two possibilities. Either they balance, or they don't. If they balance, then the different coin is in the group 9,10,11,12. So for our second weighing we would put 1,2 in the left pan and 9,10 on the right. If these balance then the different coin is either 11 or 12. Weigh coin 1 against 11. If they balance, the different coin is number 12. If they do not balance, then 11 is the different coin. If 1,2 vs 9,10 do not balance, then the different coin is either 9 or 10. Again, weigh 1 against 9. If they balance, the different coin is number 10, otherwise it is number 9. That was the easy part. What if the first weighing 1,2,3,4 vs 5,6,7,8 does not balance? Then any one of these coins could be the different coin. Now, in order to proceed, we must keep track of which side is heavy for each of the following weighings. Suppose that 5,6,7,8 is the heavy side. We now weigh 1,5,6 against 2,7,8. If they balance, then the different coin is either 3 or 4. Weigh 4 against 9, a known good coin. If they balance then the different coin is 3, otherwise it is 4. Now, if 1,5,6 vs 2,7,8 does not balance, and 2,7,8 is the heavy side, then either 7 or 8 is a different, heavy coin, or 1 is a different, light coin. For the third weighing, weigh 7 against 8. Whichever side is heavy is the different coin. If they balance, then 1 is the different coin. Should the weighing of 1,5, 6 vs 2,7,8 show 1,5,6 to be the heavy side, then either 5 or 6 is a different heavy coin or 2 is a light different coin. Weigh 5 against 6. The heavier one is the different coin. If they balance, then 2 is a different light coin.

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Riddle:

Whoever makes it, tells it not. Whoever takes it, knows it not. And whoever knows it wants it not

Answer:

Counterfeit money

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Riddle:

It's always 1 to 6,
it's always 15 to 20,
it's always 5,
but it's never 21,
unless it's flying.

Answer:

The answer is: a dice. An explanation: "It's always 1 to 6": the numbers on the faces of the dice, "it's always 15 to 20": the sum of the exposed faces when the dice comes to rest after being thrown, "it's always 5": the number of exposed faces when the dice is at rest, "but it's never 21": the sum of the exposed faces is never 21 when the dice is at rest, "unless it's flying": the sum of all exposed faces when the dice is flying is 21 (1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6).

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Riddle:

What is the next 3 letters in this riddle? o t t f f s s _ _ _

Answer:

e n t They represent the first letter when writing the numbers one thru ten.

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Riddle:

A camel travels a certain distance each day. Strangely enough, two of its legs travel 30 miles each day and the other two legs travel nearly 31 miles. It would seem that two of the camel's legs must be one mile ahead of the other two legs, but of course this can't be true.

Since the camel is normal, how is this situation possible?

Answer:

The camel operates a mill and travels in a circular clockwise direction. The two outside legs will travel a greater distance than the two inside legs.

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Riddle:

How many cats are in a small room if in each of the four corners a cat is sitting, and opposite each cat there sit three cats, and a each cat's tail another is sitting?

Answer:

Four cats, each near a tail of a cat in an adjacent corner.

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Riddle:

The title of the problem tells you how to approach these four questions.

(A).  A bus leaves Moscow for Tula at noon. An hour later a cyclist leaves Tula for mosco, moving slower than the bus. When the bus and cyclist meet, which one of the two will be farther from Moscow?

(B). Which is worth more: a pound of $10 gold peices or half a pound of $20 gold pieces?

(C). At six o'clock the wall clock struck 6 times. Checking with my watch, I noticed the time between the first and last strokes was 30 seconds. How long will the clock take to strike 12 at midnight?

(D). Three swallows fly outward from a point. When will they all be on the same plane in space?

Now check the answers. Did you fall into any of the traps which lurk in these simple problems?

Answer:

(A). Neither

(B). A pound of metal is always more than half a pound of the same metal.

(C). Six strokes took 30 seconds, therefore 12 strokes will take 60 seconds. But when the clock struck six, there were only 5 intervals between strokes, and each interval was 30/5=6 seconds. Between the first and twelfth strokes there will be 11 intervals of 6 seconds each, therefore 12 strokes will take 66 seconds.

(D). There is always a plane that contains any 3 points 

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