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Riddle:

Suppose you want to send in the mail a valuable object to a friend. You have a box which is big enough to hold the object. The box has a locking ring which is large enough to have a lock attached and you have several locks with keys. However, your friend does not have the key to any lock that you have. You cannot send the key in an unlocked box since it may be stolen or copied. How do you send the valuable object, locked, to your friend - so it may be opened by your friend?

Answer:

Send the box with a lock attached and locked. Your friend attaches his or her own lock and sends the box back to you. You remove your lock and send it back to your friend. Your friend may then remove the lock she or he put on and open the box.

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Riddle:

A camel travels a certain distance each day. Strangely enough, two of its legs travel 30 miles each day and the other two legs travel nearly 31 miles. It would seem that two of the camel's legs must be one mile ahead of the other two legs, but of course this can't be true.

Since the camel is normal, how is this situation possible?

Answer:

The camel operates a mill and travels in a circular clockwise direction. The two outside legs will travel a greater distance than the two inside legs.

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Riddle:

You are given a set of scales and 12 marbles. The scales are of the old balance variety. That is, a small dish hangs from each end of a rod that is balanced in the middle. The device enables you to conclude either that the contents of the dishes weight the same or that the dish that falls lower has heavier contents than the other. The 12 marbles appear to be identical. In fact, 11 of them are identical, and one is of a different weight. Your task is to identify the unusual marble and discard it. You are allowed to use the scales three times if you wish, but no more. Note that the unusual marble may be heavier or lighter than the others. You are asked to both identify it and determine whether it is heavy or light

Answer:

Most people seem to think that the thing to do is weight six coins against six coins, but if you think about it, this would yield you no information concerning the whereabouts of the only different coin. As we already know that one side will be heavier than the other. So that the following plan can be followed, let us number the coins from 1 to 12. For the first weighing let us put on the left pan coins 1,2,3,4 and on the right pan coins 5,6,7,8. There are two possibilities. Either they balance, or they don't. If they balance, then the different coin is in the group 9,10,11,12. So for our second weighing we would put 1,2 in the left pan and 9,10 on the right. If these balance then the different coin is either 11 or 12. Weigh coin 1 against 11. If they balance, the different coin is number 12. If they do not balance, then 11 is the different coin. If 1,2 vs 9,10 do not balance, then the different coin is either 9 or 10. Again, weigh 1 against 9. If they balance, the different coin is number 10, otherwise it is number 9. That was the easy part. What if the first weighing 1,2,3,4 vs 5,6,7,8 does not balance? Then any one of these coins could be the different coin. Now, in order to proceed, we must keep track of which side is heavy for each of the following weighings. Suppose that 5,6,7,8 is the heavy side. We now weigh 1,5,6 against 2,7,8. If they balance, then the different coin is either 3 or 4. Weigh 4 against 9, a known good coin. If they balance then the different coin is 3, otherwise it is 4. Now, if 1,5,6 vs 2,7,8 does not balance, and 2,7,8 is the heavy side, then either 7 or 8 is a different, heavy coin, or 1 is a different, light coin. For the third weighing, weigh 7 against 8. Whichever side is heavy is the different coin. If they balance, then 1 is the different coin. Should the weighing of 1,5, 6 vs 2,7,8 show 1,5,6 to be the heavy side, then either 5 or 6 is a different heavy coin or 2 is a light different coin. Weigh 5 against 6. The heavier one is the different coin. If they balance, then 2 is a different light coin.

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Riddle:

An alarm clock runs 4 minutes slow every hour. It was set right 3 1/2 hours ago. Now another clock which is correct shows noon. 

In how many minutes, to the nearest minutes, to the nearest minute, will the alarm clock show noon?

Answer:

In 3 1/2 hours the alarm clock has become 14 minutes slow. At noon the alarm clock will fall behind approximently an additional minute. Its hands will show noon in 15 minutes.

 

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Riddle:

I move very slowly at an imperceptible rate, although I take my time, I am never late. I accompany life, and survive past demise, I am viewed with esteem in many women's eyes.

What am I?

Answer:

I am your hair.

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Riddle:

Two cyclists began a training run, one starting from Moscow and the other starting from Simferopol.

When the riders were 180 miles apart, a fly took an interest. Starting on one cyclists shoulder, the fly flew ahead to meet the other cyclist. After reaching him the fly then turned around and yet back. 

The restless fly continued to shuttleback and fourth until the pair met; then settled on the nose of one rider.

The flys speed was 30 mph. Each cyclist speed was 15 mph.

How many miles did the fly travel?

Answer:

The cyclists took 6 hours to meet. The fly traveled 6*30=180 miles.

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Riddle:

A boy leaves home in the morning to go to school. At the moment he leaves the house he looks at the clock in the mirror. The clock has no number indication and for this reason the boy makes a mistake in interpreting the time (mirror-image). Just assuming the clock must be out of order, the boy cycles to school, where he arrives after twenty minutes. At that moment the clock at school shows a time that is two and a half hours later than the time that the boy saw on the clock at home.

Answer:

The difference between the real time and the time of the mirror image is two hours and ten minutes (two and a half hours, minus the twenty minutes of cycling). Therefore, the original time on the clock at home that morning could only have been five minutes past seven: The difference between these clocks is exactly 2 hours and ten minutes (note that also five minutes past one can be mirrored in a similar way, but this is not in the morning!). Conclusion: The boy reaches school at five minutes past seven plus twenty minutes of cycling, which is twenty-five minutes past seven!...

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Riddle:

A hunter met two shepherds, one of whom had three loaves and the other, five loaves. All the loaves were the same size. The three men agreed to share the eight loaves equally between them. After they had eaten, the hunter gave the shepherds eight bronze coins as payment for his meal. How should the two shepherds fairly divide this money?

Answer:

The shepherd who had three loaves should get one coin and the shepherd who had five loaves should get seven coins. If there were eight loaves and three men, each man ate two and two-thirds loaves. So the first shepherd gave the hunter one-third of a loaf and the second shepherd gave the hunter two and one-third loaves. The shepherd who gave one-third of a loaf should get one coin and the one who gave seven-thirds of a loaf should get seven coins.

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Riddle:

You can use me to stop,

You take me to smoke;

Not only do I stop, But I am a stop,

And the result of pool's first stroke.

What am I?

Answer:

Brake/ Break

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Riddle:

What number squared = 12345678987654321?

 

Answer:

111,111,111

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